My style is that I don’t just want to be pigeonholed in the “A” drawer, but that the “B” and “C” drawers open up too.

My style is that I don’t just want to be pigeonholed in the “A” drawer, but that the “B” and “C” drawers open up too.

That can change over the years, it’s a process. My style is that I don’t just want to be pigeonholed in the “A” drawer, but that the “B” and “C” drawers open up too. Musically, I don’t think in terms of drawers. Socially, I completely reject them. I know people have a certain image of me, but I only partially match that. There is still so much that I only gradually discover for myself.

Could you tell me the difference between folk music and hits? And in which direction is your current album going? That’s such a thing. One could say that the clear difference between folk music and hits is that folk music tends to encompass folk songs, brass music and traditional music. And Schlager is a bit more pop.

“For me music has no limits”

But that’s exactly where we are. For me music has no limits and in truth there are no limits either. If you take it seriously, then a hit is, in the original sense, a song that is successful. A best seller. A hit can just as easily be a folk song or a pop song. There are also a lot of genres in Schlager, some with a folk touch because you can hear an accordion in the background, the other Schlager has a disco beat in the background, the next some kind of brass. Schlager is now cross-genre.

And the folk music? In truth, when I was a little girl I made real folk music. After that, no more. Brass music, room music, that is real folk music. But that has nothing to do with what is commonly called folk music today.

Is Schlager cool today? Yes. But that also has to do with the fact that Schlager is becoming more and more modern. What is called a hit today would have been called pop or even rock 20 or 30 years ago.

“Schlager is ultimately well-made German-language music”

Do you like that? I think it’s good that the hit has become so diverse. Because as a result, many more people can identify with it. Especially the younger ones.

Schlager is ultimately well-made German-language music. Or not so well done. (laughs) It’s not just a question of taste, but also of quality. As in any genre. There is a lot of well done in Schlager these days, you really have to say that.

Her album is compared to “a conversation with a good friend”. What is it that makes a good friend? A good friend is first and foremost honest. She also says things to your face.

Do you have these good friends around you too? And are such friendships also possible among colleagues? There are definitely colleagues with whom I have a friendly relationship. For example, two years ago I was on tour with Anita and Alexandra Hofmann. We had a really good time and also had very private conversations. A friendly relationship has strengthened again through this tour so that I can really say that I made two friends.free 123helpme account

And it is the same with my live band, my girls band, the “DirndlRockBand”. The five of us are now a real group of friends and share everything when we are out together. This is more than just a professional togetherness.

Your “DirndlRockBand” consists only of women. Full female power, so to speak. How did that happen? During this time, a big upheaval took place in me and my previous male band broke up. In addition, the topic of “performing live” has increasingly faded into the background.

“I don’t like playback performances at concerts”

How come? This is more lucrative for organizers. The effort is much less. I regret that very much because I don’t really feel like it. I don’t like playing backing at concerts. It’s a different story on television, it’s been like that for many years, and it’s technically difficult to implement. But at a concert I want to perform live. I don’t feel like half playback.

I then thought about how you could make it lucrative and interesting for the organizer? Then the idea came to me, man, that would be exciting if I said, I’m coming with a girls band that creates a good atmosphere, that has a charisma that is an absolute double enrichment for such a concert. And that works really well.

How does it look in business? Is it harder as a woman? I personally would say no. I’ve never had a hard time either and have grown into my singing career. But if I asked my girls now, I know for sure that they would say yes. As musicians, male colleagues keep hearing sayings like “Well, for being a girl, you do it really well.”

Here we are on the subject of emancipation. I see that as a bit divided. Emancipation is important, but it is sometimes overdone. At least I think so. Without a fixed role model, my husband and I value a balanced partnership and loving, respectful interaction with one another. We complement each other with our strengths and weaknesses.

Maybe it just needs more bands like that, so that you can see that it goes without saying … Absolutely, exactly.

You yourself are the mother of a 17-year-old daughter. Is your song “Spann die Flügel” an appeal to Johanna? It is not an appeal, but rather a representation of the current situation. It is so that I want to encourage her to go her way.

And in which direction is the path going? It is said her daughter has intentions to follow in her parents’ footsteps professionally. Is that correct? She wants to leave her own footsteps and that’s a good thing. She wants to make music, but that is not 100% certain either, because she is currently still busy with school. Your wish is to go in a musical direction, but not to follow in my footsteps.

“Even though I’m in public, I’m only human”

Are you there, together with Johanna’s father, Stefan Mross, with advice and assistance? Of course, I am always at your side with help and advice. But she herself knows exactly what she wants. Probably also because I always gave her this freedom. I told her that she was allowed to have her own opinion and that we could always talk about anything. And she can always share her thoughts with me without having to be afraid.

© imago / Spöttel Picture Stefanie Hertel with father Eberhard and husband Lanny Lanner, Semper Opern Ball in Dresden on February 1st, 2019

She and Mr. Mross were considered “the dream couple in folk music” for 17 years. The divorce followed in 2012. Last year, the “dream couple of the Schlagerwelt”, Helene Fischer and Florian Silbereisen split up. How can you imagine a breakup in public? Oh, to be honest, I don’t feel like talking about it anymore because it’s so old hat. But it is discussed again and again and that doesn’t make it any better. Even though I’m in public, I’m only human. It doesn’t make it easier for me if you keep coming back to it. I have been happily married to my husband Lanny Lanner for five years. And that’s the only thing that counts for us.

Her husband Lanny Lanner also appeared on her album. How do you separate the private and the professional? We don’t want to separate that at all. We are both musicians with heart and soul. Music and our job always play a role for us. This is our calling and not just our job. There are certain business matters that we won’t discuss at the dinner table. But talking about music, talking about the last gig, that’s something that fills us and we love to discuss it in the evenings on the couch.

Stefanie Hertel’s album “Kopf Hoch, Krone auf und Weiter” is available here *

The links marked with an asterisk (*) are so-called affiliate links. If you click on an affiliate link and shop via this link, news.at receives a commission from the online shop or provider concerned. The price does not change for you.

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The

Corona situation

According to a recent survey, the Austrians have a lasting negative impact: every second estimates that the economy is going downhill and therefore almost half of the respondents said that people are dissatisfied. On the other hand, every second thought that the current circumstances could lead to a more conscious life.

According to the Linz pollsters from the IMAS Institute, the pandemic makes one thing clear in particular: the priorities have shifted, the awareness of Austrians is showing clear changes, according to the representative survey published on Friday. 73 percent of those surveyed stated that the Corona crisis would have a “very strong” or “somewhat” effect on future everyday life. 22 percent assumed that more or less everything would remain the same, five percent did not provide any information.

New working worlds

When asked about those life-determining aspects that will become increasingly important, 49 percent named fear for the job. 44 percent expect a significant change in the world of work with regard to short-time work, home office and video conferencing, and sensitivity to people suffering from the flu or coughing will increase enormously (39 percent), as will hygiene awareness (38 percent). On the other hand, according to 39 percent of those surveyed, the importance of travel or attending major events will “decrease sharply”, as will the use of public transport, at least 17 percent said.

Overall, 54 percent of those surveyed expect that the economic and living conditions in Austria will “tend to deteriorate” in the coming months. Only 15 percent gave the thumbs up, 26 percent assumed that the situation would remain unchanged and four percent did not provide any information. Even before the outbreak of Corona in December 2019, only a quarter of Austrians said that worse times would come.

Believe in a “better” life with Corona

At the same time, however, the Austrians also associate positive expectations with the Corona crisis. 50 percent believe in a “better” life, the interviewed men and women were largely in agreement, as were old and young, or city dwellers and people in the country. 33 percent saw no potential for change and 17 did not provide any information.

Looking back, the survey found that the Austrians were most concerned about not having social contacts during the lockdown. This is what 34 percent of those questioned said. 15 percent also had problems wearing mouth and nose protection. The ongoing crisis has evidently mean that 47 percent of those interviewed have the impression that most people in the country are no longer satisfied with their lives, although 30 percent still believed this very well. Between May 20 and June 16, IMAS interviewed 1,005 Austrians aged 16 and over.

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In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (Trend.at)

The 35 best family series to laugh and feel good (tv-media.at)

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The

Corona situation

According to a recent survey, the Austrians have a lasting negative impact: every second estimates that the economy is going downhill and therefore almost half of the respondents said that people are dissatisfied. On the other hand, every second thought that the current circumstances could lead to a more conscious life.

According to the Linz pollsters from the IMAS Institute, the pandemic makes one thing clear in particular: the priorities have shifted, the awareness of Austrians is showing clear changes, according to the representative survey published on Friday. 73 percent of those surveyed stated that the Corona crisis would have a “very strong” or “somewhat” effect on future everyday life. 22 percent assumed that more or less everything would remain the same, five percent did not provide any information.

New working worlds

When asked about those life-determining aspects that will become increasingly important, 49 percent named fear for the job. 44 percent expect a significant change in the world of work with regard to short-time work, home office and video conferencing, and sensitivity to people suffering from the flu or coughing will increase enormously (39 percent), as will hygiene awareness (38 percent). On the other hand, according to 39 percent of those surveyed, the importance of travel or attending major events will “decrease sharply”, as will the use of public transport, at least 17 percent said.

Overall, 54 percent of those surveyed expect that the economic and living conditions in Austria will “tend to deteriorate” in the coming months. Only 15 percent gave the thumbs up, 26 percent assumed that the situation would remain unchanged and four percent did not provide any information. Even before the outbreak of Corona in December 2019, only a quarter of Austrians said that worse times would come.

Believe in a “better” life with Corona

At the same time, however, the Austrians also associate positive expectations with the Corona crisis. 50 percent believe in a “better” life, the interviewed men and women were largely in agreement, as were old and young, or city dwellers and people in the country. 33 percent saw no potential for change and 17 did not provide any information.

Looking back, the survey found that the Austrians were most concerned about not having social contacts during the lockdown.